Farming the sun

After two and half years of making a little over 25% of my electricity from a 6-panel PV array, we decided to bump up our production significantly. On June 30 we went online with an additional 18 panels. From July 5 to August 5, with both arrays producing electricity, we made 1275 kWh. My monthly average usage over the last two years is 770 kWh. That gives us an average daily usage of 25.66 kWh. With my new array, I averaged 42.5 kWh/day. In the months of June and July I did not produce enough to satisfy my usage since I had a house full of family with significant demands on hot water (dishwasher, washing machine, showers) and on hot days, the air conditioning. However, on an annual average, we should be producing at least 85-90% of our usage.

24 panels_07132016

Our Friend Donald E. Laughlin (Don was a life-long Quaker Friend) passed away on August 19, 2016. Don wrote a simple, straightforward, and powerful letter (he actually dictated it to others since he was not able to write at that time), to Warren Buffet, the billionaire investor sage of Omaha. Buffet’s portfolio includes MidAmerican Energy, a very large wind energy producer in Iowa. Why would Don, an engineer and inventor, do that? Don was a long-time advocate of renewable distributed energy and therefore urged Buffet to support not just his own renewable energy projects, but also distributed energy projects that individuals build at their own homes. Here is Don’s letter as published in the Des Moines Register on August 9, 2016:

An open letter to Warren Buffett on solar power

Don Laughlin 4:59 p.m. CDT August 9, 2016

Note to readers: Don Laughlin has worked on renewable energy for decades — and lived it. He put up a wind turbine at his country home near West Branch, later moving to Iowa City and filling the roof with solar panels. In his final days, this advocate is pushing his message forward. Now unable to write by hand, he spoke this week of his regret at not sending a letter to billionaire Warren Buffett to make MidAmerican Energy more friendly to rooftop solar. Distributed generation is the issue — helping homeowners get a better return on their solar investment, which MidAmerican has opposed. In Don’s usual positive approach to a contested issue, he dictated this letter from his nursing home bed. It’s a letter to Warren Buffett, but to all of us as well.

— David Osterberg, Mount Vernon, and Nathan Shepherd, Iowa City

Dear Mr. Buffett,

My name is Don Laughlin. I’ve worked in developing solar power for years. I’m also one of your company’s (MidAmerican Energy) customers.

First, I want to compliment you for the great deal of wind power that MidAmerican has built and is continuing to build. One area where your good renewable work has not penetrated, however, is distributed renewable energy. Solar photovoltaic panels installed on rooftops are a great untapped source of electricity. If you were to change your company’s policy to encourage distributed generation, you would allow your customers to be part of the solution to climate change.

I recently read in the Atlantic Monthly about your influence on your children’s philanthropies. I admire your son Howard and his important work on eliminating hunger in the world. Please encourage him to remember the potential advantages of distributed electricity to help eliminate hunger in Africa. At the same time, you, perhaps more than others, are in a great position to help some electric customers in our country reduce the terrible effects of climate change, which makes African farming much harder.

I am not able to hand-write this letter myself because of a recent stroke, and at 93 I am nearing the end of my life on this planet. As a parting message, I want to encourage you in the strongest terms to use your influence to make distributed solar energy a major source of electricity at all your companies and in Howard’s foundation work. You are both in a position to change the world. Please use your influence.

— Don Laughlin of Iowa City”

 

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